Gear

MAIN TOURING & RECORDING SETUP

The questions I seem to be asked the most are about my equipment! So here is a rundown of what I use, live and in the studio. But a quick disclaimer of sorts: While I love beautiful guitars and amps as much as everyone else, they’re still just the tools to make music, which is what this is all about! Tone starts with your own concept of it, and how you approach, touch, and play the instrument in the first place.

Everything listed on this page is here because it’s genuinely the best sounding, highest quality and most inspiring I’ve ever found, and will reproduce my playing and my music the best, for me, and very importantly, do it reliably night after night. The only gear I own is what I use every day. After more than 20 years of playing live I still only own half a dozen guitars and amps. And any manufacturer I work with and whose products I endorse is because I selected, and purchased, their products in the first place and found it to be the very best for me, and developed a relationship with them out of that. Just so you know! So, with that said…


1961_Fender_Strat

1961 FENDER STRATOCASTER

For 10 years, my 1961 Fender Stratocaster was the guitar I played on every gig. All original, except for a refret with 6100 wire, a five way switch with the tone knob wired to the bridge pickup, and replacement vintage style saddles. It’s had a few different pickups in it over the years, but is now back to stock. It’s my benchmark guitar, and has been used on every record I have made. It only comes out to local shows, or special occasions now: Too many close calls with airline baggage handlers over the years, so it’s hard touring days are over. Luckily, for nearly 20 years I’ve known Simon Law, who has spent many hours working with me and my ’61 Strat, both on tour, in the studio, and in his “shed of tone”. After a few prototypes he eventually decoded the ’61’s DNA to build me the first guitar that ever made me consider retiring the original. I now tour exclusively with his SVL Guitars. 

 


StreamImage (1)

SVL SIXTY-ONE ‘DAYTONA’

My main touring guitar is an SVL Sixty-One model, known as ‘Daytona’, for it’s distinctive blue paint work inspired by the vintage Ferrari of the same name. Just like my ’61 this is an alder body, maple neck, brazilian board, with 6100 frets, and all vintage style hardware and specs. The only real deviation is the fingerboard radius flattens out from 7 1/4 to 9 1/2 after the 12th fret. With the addition of the new Amalfitano SVL Daytona pickups I’m as happy as I could be with this toneful and roadworthy new guitar. Premier Guitar Magazine editor Joe Coffey, was at the Montreal Jazz festival and photographed the Daytona. See Joe’s photograph and read about ‘The Daytona’ Here.


StreamImage

SVL FIFTY-NINE

SVL also built me a Fifty-Nine model recently. This is essentially an ash body, hard tail version of ‘Daytona’, in beautiful see-through blonde. B.B. King was kind enough to sign it for me last year! Daytona and the Fifty-Nine made their recording debut on Anything But Time along with my original ’61 Strat.


Matt and SVL

SVL SIXTY-CUSTOM

I also used my SVL Sixty-Custom guitar in several places on the last couple of records, and it often comes out on tour too. It was built as a replacement for Simon’s 1969 Telecaster that I “borrowed” for many years, and visually inspired by the early sixties edge bound Tele Customs I always loved the look of. It’s also an alder body, Brazilian board, and 6100 frets, with Lindy Fralin Blues Special pickups.

 


matt_strings

CURT MANGAN GUITAR STRINGS

All my guitars are strung with Curt Mangan – Matt Schofield Signature nickel-wound strings in gauge 11-14-18-28-38-54. I discovered Curt’s strings by chance a few years ago, and quickly realized they were the best I’d ever tried. Aside from the great tone and feel, I’ve never broken a single one on a show. In fact, I used graphite saddles on many guitars to prevent breakage before discovering Curt’s strings, which allowed me to go back to my preferred steel saddles. I also use 1mm Curt Mangen “Curtex” picks.


holland Fender reverb


13806_Two_Rock_Matt_Schofield_Signature_Head_800_0

TWO-ROCK MATT SCHOFIELD 50 SIGNATURE AMP

Since late 2005 I’ve almost exclusively played through Two-Rock Amplifiers, both live and in the studio. When I first discovered these amps, they instantly made me think of a much more refined and evolved version of the great vintage blackface amps I’d grown up playing. I started out with a 50 watt Custom Reverb Signature version 1, then moved on to to a 100 watt Custom Reverb Sig version 2. In 2006 they built a custom 4×10 speaker cabinet for me, which is still my preferred configuration after many years of vintage Supers. After finally meeting the guys at Two-Rock in person on my first US tour a couple of year ago they developed a modified version of their Classic Reverb amp for me, which they continued to tweak to my tastes through out 2010 and 2011. This has culminated in the new Two-Rock Matt Schofield Signature Model, released through the good folks at Premier Builders Guild. I can honestly say this is the best amp I’ve ever plugged into, and I’m honoured that it bares my name. It’s a 50 watt single channel amp, with dual GZ34 rectifiers, and the most amazing valve tremolo built in. It combines all the things I love about vintage amps with the huge Two-Rock sonic foot print, incredible dynamic response, and exceptional reliability.


eminence_0

EMINENCE RAGIN CAJUN SPEAKERS

I load my Two-Rock 4×10 cabinet with Eminence Ragin Cajun speakers, which are biggest strongest sounding tens I’ve found. Over the last few years of using them, they have become an important ingredient to my overall live sound. They’re toneful, well balanced and efficient, and I’ve never blown one up!
For 12″ speakers, including in my Two-Rock 2×12 I often use when recording, I usually mix a combination of older Celestion G12-80 or G12-65, or Scumback H75 speakers. However, my favourite recording cab at the moment is a Bludotone ported 1×12 with a EVM12L. 


VertexMattSchofieldPedalboardFront_zps633cf438

Click to enlarge

EFFECTS, PEDALBOARD AND CABLES

My pedalboard is very simple, and largely for controlling my rig, as opposed to adding “effects” or things that change the tone. In fact, I go to great lengths to find pedals that don’t change the direct tone and response of the guitar and amp too much, and “feel” right with the rig.

Firstly I go into a Sonic Research St-200 strobe tuner. It’s the most accurate, compact and reliable stage tuner I’ve found.

Next is my Free The Tone Matt Schofield Signature SOV-2 Overdrive. The SOV-2 pedal is my all time favourite overdrive, and has been a vital part of my rig for many years. I’m honoured to now have my own signature edition. The MS version is based on my personal favourite original early production Providence Free The Tone SOV-2 that was on my pedal board for many years. It’s been updated with a new buffered, noisless switching system that drives the cables back to my amp while sounding exactly the same as plugging straight in. The SOV is a very responsive and dynamic overdrive, and while it can be very harmonically rich, thick and textured, it always remains exceptionally clear and open, and transparent to the guitar and amp. The Free The Tone Matt Schofield Signature SOV-2 Overdrive is a limited edition pedal and is only available for 2013, so grab one while you can! Honestly, it’s really great!

After that, for a long time, I used a Klon Centaur as clean boost. For the last few months I’ve been enjoying a Vemuram Jan Ray in place of the Klon. It’s a great boost and light overdrive pedal, one of the best I’ve heard, and the first thing to come along that made me pull the Klon of the board. It also compliments the SOV very well. I’ve also been really enjoying the Mad Professor Royal Blue Overdrive or Free The Tone Red Jasper lately, for other low-gain boost/overdrive flavours.

Next are two Mad Professor Deep Blue Delay pedals. One set a little longer than a slap-back echo, with no repeats, is on for 99% of the night. The other is set to a longer delay with a couple of repeats for the occasional tune. Although it’s a subtle part of the sound, it has none the less become a key ingredient for me, and is the only stomp box delay that I like as much as my favourite tape echo units. It’s simply voiced very well. It also, very importantly, doesn’t mess up the dry signal in anyway. We recently added a second Deep Blue Delay to the board to save me bending down and fiddling with the pedal for a couple of tunes where I use a longer echo.

I’ve used Providence cables for along time, and recently I’ve also been using the new Free The Tone cable too. I use Providence H207 from the guitar, Free The Tone CU-505o on the board, and CU-6550 back to the amp.


 

 ADDITIONAL GUITARS, AMPS AND EFFECTS

Occasionally live, but mostly in the studio you might find me with the following extra gear:

  • Providence – FBT-1 Final Booster, DLY-4 Chrono Delay, FDR-1F Flame Drive and SOV-1.
  • Mad Professor – Forest Green Compressor, Little Green Wonder, Sweet Honey Overdrive.
  • Xotic effects – RC & AC Booster
  • Cause & Effect Pedals – FET Dream Overdrive.
  • Strymon Engineering – El Capistan Delay & Flint Reverb/Trem
  • Fuchs Audio Technology – Verbrator Reverb.
  • Fulltone – Tube Tape Echo.
  • SVL – “Vibroclone” 1964 Vibroverb amp, built off the chassis of a 1969 Fender Bandmaster, circuit blueprinted from my ’64 Super, and rehoused in a custom 1×15 combo cab.
  • Matchless – Cheiftain or C30. I’ve always liked Matchless amps for when I want something with a completely different flavour to my usual set-up.
  • 1969 Fender Vibratone Leslie -The biggest and best chorus effect!
  • Tokai ES-120 – Tokai custom shop’s great take on a vintage ES-335. I like it better than most of the real thing I’ve tried!
  • Taylor – 414 Acoustic

45 Comments

  •  
    Gilles VIOLET

    July 27, 2014 at 4:13 am

    Reply

    Hi,
    I Have a Two Rock MS signature With the 4×10 .
    Could you tell me which position Matt’s use about the “Classic/modern” switch on the back panel ?
    Could you tell me the name and ref. Of the (NOS) tubes pre-amp (V1 and phase inverter) on the Matt’s amp.

    Thanks a lot
    Gilles

    • Matt Schofield
       
      Matt Schofield

      July 30, 2014 at 4:34 pm

      Hi Gilles.

      Almost all the time I use the modern setting. As for the tubes, I’ve actually no idea. I have 3 of my amps. My US rig I just used this past couple of weeks has the stock factory preamp tubes. Tung Sol reissue I think. My UK amp probably has a Mullard in V1 that Simon Law had lying around. Can’t remember exactly. And my prototype amp I think has an old RCA in it that I found and it sounded OK! V1 is the only thing I change, if at all. The rest of the tubes are whatever comes with the amp. I’m not a tube tweaker at all. If the amp works and sounds good, then I leave it alone!

      Cheers……..Matt

  •  
    Gilles VIOLET

    August 3, 2014 at 2:51 pm

    Reply

    Thanks a lot for your answer Matt , and congratulation for all the fun and pleasure That you give to us.

    Regards
    Gilles

  •  
    Dave

    August 5, 2014 at 10:48 am

    Reply

    Vertex Axis Wah is a relabeled BBE Ben Wah
    Details are on The Gear Page, here is a link
    http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?t=1461942
    There are pictures and many details showing the Vertex Axis Wah is no more
    then a BBE Ben wah with some cosmetic changes, no circuit board mods as claimed.
    Have a Good Day,…

  •  
    admin

    August 5, 2014 at 11:42 am

    Reply

    IF I may chime in…

    I am sure Matt know’s this and I am not sure which tube it is in the MS Sig amp but in my Custom Reverb Sig V2 it is V5 and called the Phase Inverter Tube. A lot of people having sound issues with amps always look at V1 or V2 (if you have an overdrive channel). Fair enough but not many people realize the importance of that Phase Inverter tube.

    While the Phase Inverter is more of a functional tube as it’s intention is to flip the signal 180deg however it should be one of the strongest tubes in your amp. If your V1 overpowers a weak phase inverter you will lose a lot of touch dynamics. When you drive the front end of the amp hard it’s not as much V1 that is giving you your tube distortion but the phase inverter.

    Many people experiment with V1 find out what tube is your phase inverter in there and play with that a bit too. You will be surprised at the difference in the colour of your sound and touch dynamics.

    While the MS Sig amp doesn’t likely have a drive channel V2 tube it will have a rectifier tube so the layout may be the same you can check your manual for that.

    The output tubes are much less important and really any good quality solid built new output tubes will provide you what your looking for. I prefer the short bottle tubes like Tung-Sol or the TAD-WGC-STR’s are great. However if you’re not broke I suggest ordering a quartet of them all matched. I have had the odd broken tube in a shipment from Germany. This gives you a full set and they will replace the broken one with the same matched tube.

    I have been playing around for 5 years with different tube flavours and one thing I will say is stay away from Ebay. Many counterfeit tubes there and many that are Dead on arrival or so used up they are not worth purchasing.

    The Tube Museum in New York is a great source for NOS tubes. But I find most of the quality re-pop’s are just as good. The good thing is they are easily found. The NOS tubes when you get an awesome sounding one, when it’s gone it’s gone and you feel like your compromising sound after you replace it. I have spent as much as $100 CAD for a 12ax7

    Some of the best V1 tubes I have ever had were 1970’s issue RFT tubes and old 1950’s Tung-Sol (the original ones) But IMHO, while good, not worth the cost.

    However I just ordered a entire tube replacement set from Mac at Two-Rock today.

  •  
    Gilles VIOLET

    August 6, 2014 at 10:43 am

    Reply

    Hi Mark ( Admin, is not It ?)
    Here below the layout of the MS amp:
    V1- Preamp 12AX7
    V2- Reverb return, Mixing Stage 12AX7
    V3- Reverb drive 12AT7
    V4- Tremolo 12AX7
    V5- Phase inverter 12AX7
    V6, V7- SED Winged “C” 6L6, Output
    V8, V9- 5AR4 Tube rectifier
    A this moment my V1 is an NOS GE 12AT7 (less gain) that i prefer vs the 12ax7 std (tun sol)
    I ordered an NOS Mullard 12ax7…i Will test It on v1 and phase inverter….
    For more deep Reverb, i tested 12ax7 vs 12at7 (V3) and It works great too.

    Other thing, Matt use his amp With the gain knob at 10 oclock and the Master around 1 or 2 o’clock….it’s very very loud on my amp and i can’t Play at this volume With my band because they want to kill me !!

    •  
      Mark

      August 19, 2014 at 12:38 pm

      Yes Gilles it’s both Mark and Admin.

      I also use a lower gain tube in my Two-Rock but for V2 which is the overdrive channel. I use a 5751 which is very similar to the 12AT7 For the Phase inverter I prefer the Tube Amp Doctor’s 7025S It’s a hi-grade well tested tube that is balanced so that both sides are equal in output. And from everything I have read that is critical for a Phase Inverter tube.

  •  
    Ron Beaton

    August 11, 2014 at 11:11 am

    Reply

    Could I please ask if the SOV-2 Matt uses is relatively quiet in operation, ie free from annoying hum/hiss/buzz etc which is a real pain for bedroom noodling or recording. Looking forward to seeing Matt at the Huntingdon Hall, thanks and regards Ron.

  •  
    Zsolt Dubravcsik

    August 19, 2014 at 12:31 pm

    Reply

    Nice to see these comments of the tube replacements in those Two Rock Amps. I’ve always been a huge Matt Schofield fan since I’ve first heard him playing. I’ve always been blown away not only of his phenomenal playing style but of his tone. But I’m not a tehcnical guy so I cannot understand a lot of things what you’re talking about. However I’d like to mention that I’ve heard an amp recently which was custom built by a top hungarian sound engineer. The sound quality of that amp was really great. It was as good as Matt’s own amp. Huge sound, rich harmonics, great sustain, clarity and a lot of headroom. But the surprise just came after I looked inside the back of it. It had only 1 tube in it! And another one for the reverb. So I’m a bit confused now. What do you think is important in an amp design? I’d be grateful for your comments guys. Many thanks, Zsolt from Hungary

    •  
      Mark

      August 19, 2014 at 12:55 pm

      Sounds like a Valve-State amp Zsolt.

      I’ve heard many of them in my day (BTW I play as well), But I have never heard them approach a good old full-tube amp. I’m no expert on electronics but it’s my understanding that you will always need at least 3 tubes. Preamp, Poweramp and phase inverter. Subbing any of them out with solid state in my mind produces in inferior sound (for those looking for authentic tube sound). It’s possible of course to have one power amp tube and just have a 25 watt amp Matt’s amp has two for 50 watts and mine is 2-4 switchable for 50 or 100 watt. Most of the Valve-State amps have a tube preamp and solid state power amp. Most of the tone is reproduced in the preamp tube. And I say Reproduced for a good reason. Truly said tone comes from the fingers, but you need good equipment to reproduce it or to even learn HOW to produce it.

      Hopefully Matt will chime in and give his thought on that.

      Mark

  •  
    Basar

    August 20, 2014 at 8:07 am

    Reply

    Hi Matt!
    Do you prefer to keep your amp clean or at the edge of a break up or driven already and push it further by the overdrive? And have you ever tried or considered using an input buffer also in addition to the SOV-2’s output buffer? I heard that it can make things a little bit complicated.

  •  
    James

    September 12, 2014 at 8:51 pm

    Reply

    Does anyone know more about the Amalfitano SVL Daytona pickups? Their website isn’t the most informative with info and sound clips. Neither is youtube for that matter. The only thing I have to go off of is Matt’s playing on youtube through a very expensive rig which I can’t afford. So the pickups sound kind of dark. Would they be suited to play clean Soul, RnB, Jazz, through either a Hot Rod Deville 3 or Twin Reverb RI at lower volumes?

  •  
    Ian Wong

    September 29, 2014 at 9:11 am

    Reply

    hello Matt

    i hv got ur Free the tone ms sov2 and janray Pedal!
    i know now u use the janray, but i want to u are both on the sov and janray for solo ? or ?

  •  
    GILLES VIOLET

    November 26, 2014 at 6:18 am

    Reply

    Hi all,
    I know Matt use a ” voltage regulator / filtering” in his set up…Could you let me know which the ref/model is it ?
    Thanks a lot
    Gilles

  •  
    Mark Wigston

    November 26, 2014 at 7:52 am

    Reply

    HI Ian.

    Actually I think at the moment the Jan Ray is out of the board and replaced for now with a Mad Professor Royal Blue. But basically I think he uses this first boost as just a way to drive the preamp tubes a bit harder for a bit of a breakup on the clean side. So yes for some soloing but the MS-SOV-MS1V is the primary overdrive for solos. What he would be looking for in the first overdrive would be no so much the drive but to use the gain for a bit of a push and primarily something that doesn’t affect tone, and doesn’t have much compression so that his picking dynamics are not squashed. If I am off the mark here Matt will chime in and correct me I’m sure 😉

    Hi Gilles

    I don’t know the actual model however when I spoke to Simon Law about them some time ago because I could certainly hear my amp’s responsiveness altered when the voltage I was plugging into here in North America dipped to even 115 volts. My amp seems to love 118 volts when the tubes are biased properly and so I am using one as well. Simon suggested Furman or Sampson as power conditioners and personally I have a furman AR-1215. You can get into some even more expensive ones that have RF filtering and such to get rid of some induced noise into the power system as well.

    Robben Ford I know uses a Variac on his Dumble Amps. A Variac allows you to actually dial in the voltage you want. I don’t suggest one however without at least using a power conditioner because as the voltage goes up and down, so will it on the Variac and you could send dangerously high voltage to your amp and do some damage. you can visit Variac.com to browse some of those.

  •  
    Steve Place

    December 1, 2014 at 3:19 pm

    Reply

    After watching Simon’s Rig (Rug) Rundown, I got the urge to tinker – I knew that Matt’s bridge pup was wired to one tone control, but not that his neck pup bypassed the other one. Would it be possible for someone to upload a very basic wiring diagram for this mod?

  •  
    Mark

    December 1, 2014 at 6:29 pm

    Reply

    Hi Steve

    I just spoke with Simon Law and he says “Its easy as anything! Simply disconnect the wire going from the neck tone control to the switch! Boom easy as that”

  •  
    Steve Place

    December 2, 2014 at 3:18 am

    Reply

    Thanks for that gentlemen (and the photo of the bridge tone pot on fb)! One last thing, am I right in thinking the other tone pot is completely bypassed now……no connections at all?

  •  
    Mark

    December 2, 2014 at 5:17 am

    Reply

    Correct the only tone pot that is connected is for the bridge pickup.

  •  
    Marc paola

    December 23, 2014 at 8:05 am

    Reply

    Hey Matt i agree one hundred percent re the fender super reverb amps. I own two and keep things simple as well. I run a 61 strat and a 50s reissue with just a boss delay and maxon overdrive. That amp and the strat would have to be one of the best amp/guitar combos of all time.

    Cheers from OZ
    Marc Paola

  •  
    Ozgur Hazar

    December 29, 2014 at 9:26 am

    Reply

    Hi Mat,

    I was fortune enough to met with you in Istanbul backstage.How you prefer to place your boost after or before overdrive and why ? i have sov-2 and katana boost trying to figured out which place is better for boost pedal.Thanks for your comments.

    Regards
    Ozgur

  •  
    Bob Hewii

    December 31, 2014 at 5:46 am

    Reply

    I’ve been using Jerry Amalfitano SP pickups for awhile in my 61 Shoreline Gold Strat – along with my old ’65 Deluxe Reverb.
    This combination certainly gives me ‘the tone I hear in my head’ – and after reviewing your rig, I’ve ditched a lot of pedals from my board in favour of Butterfly FX Golden Arrow – just to give that clean, transparent boost.
    Your tone is an inspiration Matt – thank you!

  •  
    Marco

    January 29, 2015 at 3:57 am

    Reply

    Hi Mat,

    Is your Tokai ES-120 stock or did you made any changes to it?

    Thanks 🙂

  •  
    Cosimo Suma

    March 9, 2015 at 9:17 pm

    Reply

    Congratulazioni per la masterclass ed il favoloso concerto al Bristol Jazz&Blues Festival dell’8 Marzo 2015.
    Saluti dall’Italia.

  •  
    James

    March 23, 2015 at 10:21 pm

    Reply

    Does anyone know how Simon sets up Matt’s guitars? What are the measurements for the string height and where on the neck does he measure? Also, what are the pickup heights when he uses the Amalfitano’s?

  •  
    Fede S. Kajganich

    April 29, 2015 at 10:30 am

    Reply

    Hey Matt,

    I’m a great fan, Curt Mangan Strings endorser, and about to get my Nash S63 back from guitar center with Amalfitano SVL Daytonas installed. I just wanted to know if you currently have those pickups installed in any of your guitars.

    Thanks!
    www.facebook.com/fivesband
    www.youtube.com/argbluesman

    •  
      Mark Wigston

      January 24, 2016 at 2:38 pm

      Hi Fede..

      I believe they are indeed installed on his Daytona Blue SVL guitar. The other SVL’s I believe have the SVL Vintage 59’s in them.

  •  
    Mike

    September 27, 2015 at 10:19 am

    Reply

    Hey Matt,

    Saw you at the Funky Biscuit last night. Amazing show, the energy was incredible and from what I could see everyone left the show with their spirit touched by an amazing talent.

    Your tone was as good as I have ever heard, and you elicited the most amazing emotional response in everyone there. Their faces told the story.

    Thanks for sharing your passion and talent.

    Mike

  •  
    Gregg Stallings

    November 9, 2015 at 7:42 pm

    Reply

    Matt – I dig your playing very much and I hope you can come to Oklahoma (it’s a state!) someday. On the ’10 from the Road’ record, what is the amp? It sounds raspier than the tone on other recordings. I feel it’s your best sounding tone I’ve heard thusfar.

    •  
      Mark Wigston

      January 24, 2016 at 2:41 pm

      Hi Greg.

      I think that would be Still his Two-Rock Matt Schofield Signature amp, and very likely the addition of a Vintage Fender Deluxe Reverb, using a Lehle P-Split to correct the phase and give a proper split to each amp. The Fender add’s a bit more sparkle and presence to the sound. He will often use that setup or his Favorite setup would be the Two-Rock with a Blackface Super Reverb. (Very loud though!)

  •  
    Stephen Mann

    March 16, 2016 at 2:44 am

    Reply

    Hi Matt!

    I’ve read that your guitars are set up with “medium high” action. Is there any way you could quantify that?

    What, for example, is the distance from the low and high E strings to the last fret?

    Many thanks,
    -Stephen

  •  
    Maynard

    July 1, 2016 at 11:37 am

    Reply

    Two questions…

    What made you decide on the super reverbs?

    How can I wire my strat to your specs?

    •  
      Mark Wigston

      December 14, 2016 at 4:00 pm

      I’ll try to answer here if I may. Any good vintage Fender is going to give a lot of goodness in an amp. The Two-Rock amps are very much based on a fender style amp. Just new, and very durable. You will often see him (more often than not) using both on stage with a Lehle P-Split. For that matter most of Dumble’s designs are based on fender designs.

    •  
      Mark Wigston

      December 14, 2016 at 4:08 pm

      Firstly you would of course want to change out your pickups to what would be used. You can contact SVL guitars (search it on google) you can buy the Vintage 59’s I believe right on Simon’s website. Then only one of his tone controls is connected this does affect the output of the guitar. A wiring diagram can be found here.

      Wiring Diagram

  •  
    Olivier

    October 29, 2016 at 8:51 am

    Reply

    Hi Matt,
    Could you let me know please why you use Vemuram Jan ray, Mad Professor Royal Blue overdrive as clean boost and not use the Final Booster of Free the Tone?
    Thanks
    Best regards
    Olivier

    •  
      Mark Wigston

      December 14, 2016 at 3:57 pm

      I’ll try to answer here for Matt. You have to understand that every boost pedal is doing to work slightly differently in each amp. A boost pedal that sounds amazing in a two-rock might not be what your looking for in a Vintage Blackface Super Reverb for example. Matt uses only a clean channel on amps and uses the boost to get all that goodness. The Jan Ray or the Royal Blue is a bit more subtle and can be left on as a clean boost and then the MS-SOV used for solo boost. And all that can change when you plug into a different amp. Free the tone is an amazing company and manufacturer and Matt not only endorses their product but they have produced what Matt specifically wanted as well.

  •  
    Morten Andersen

    February 16, 2017 at 4:19 pm

    Reply

    Hi Matt!

    Great to se a player of my own age delivering sweet tones out of whatever you serves us with.

    The ’61 Strat is it only the neck pickup that is out of the toneknob or is it both neck and midle pickups that are without the tone pot? I’ve got a 2007 NAMM ’62 Strat my self woundering to rewire it as the bridge pickup is without tone pot and to bright for my taste.

    Found my self deep into Free The Tone World since the Reverb was lanched. Got mine today from my dealer together with one of the last Flight Time delays. Had the Avatar Chorus from before, man it’s like kandy and easy to dial in compared to the big S company I never did get familiar with how to dial in. FTT is easy to dial in, and they are much smaller = need smaller pedalboard 🙂.

    Kind Regards
    Morten
    Norway

  •  
    Paul Tillett

    April 2, 2017 at 8:53 pm

    Reply

    Hello Matt and Admin,

    I just wanted to confirm something re the disconnection of the middle/neck tone control: this is done RATHER THAN turning this control down to “0” as a cleaner or smoother sound is achieved? Or is it a case “I never use it…don’t want to accidentally move it during performance”… ?

    Thanks in advance

    •  
      Mark Wigston

      June 1, 2017 at 11:51 am

      Mark here (webmaster and friend) It’s done because it actually because the control is not used for one, and secondly it takes a bit of load off the signal providing a tiny bit more output from the guitar to the amp. Consequently if you have ever had a Super Reverb amplifier you will know that most everyone plugs into the trem input. if you pull the first preamp tube “V1” that does much the same thing. You will notice a lot more front end integrity in doing so.

  •  
    Mike Kravit

    June 26, 2017 at 9:01 am

    Reply

    Hi Matt,

    Looking forward to your return at the Biscuit.
    Any idea when you’ll be back home and in town?

    Mike

  •  
    Roger Bergen

    July 18, 2017 at 5:57 pm

    Reply

    Just put a set of Simon’s Vintage ’59 pickups in my Custom Shop ’59 Strat and they sound awesome…highly recommended!

  •  
    Roger B.

    August 1, 2017 at 6:14 pm

    Reply

    Would really appreciate it to know the pickup heights Matt uses on his Strats (measured from the bottom of the low and high E strings to the polepiece top when fretting the strings at the last fret). Thanks!

  •  
    olivier

    August 18, 2017 at 7:48 am

    Reply

    Hi Matt,
    You change and use now Free The Tone CU-505o on the board, and CU-6550 back to the amp, but why you still use Providence H207 from the guitar?
    Thanks
    Best regards
    Olivier

  •  
    Chris Maguire

    October 9, 2017 at 4:44 pm

    Reply

    Hi Matt,

    I’ve seen on a few videos you were using JJ Guitars. Are you endorsing their stuff?

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